irefiordiligi
stelleappese:

italiansreclaimingitaly:

What a coincidence! Tumblr celebrates International Literacy Day and Google celebrates Ludovico Ariosto’s 540th birthday.
Ludovico Ariosto was born on this day in 1474 in Reggio Emilia and is one of the most important figures in Italian Literature. His most famous work is the epic poem “Orlando Furioso" (1516), a continuation of Matteo Maria Boiardo’s "Orlando Innamorato" (1495). Orlando is Charlemagne’s most famous paladin during the war against the Saracens and the poem describes his struggle among duty, chivalry and love for the pagan princess Angelica in a world where reality and fantasy merge. There are a wizard, a sea monster, a hippogriff and a trip to the moon. No kidding. 
Another couple of noteworthy characters are the female Christian warrior Bradamante and the Saracen Ruggiero, who are regarded as the ancestors of the noble Este family, patrons of Boiardo and Ariosto. Bradamante and Ruggiero fall in love, but she refuses to marry him unless he converts to Christianity. Bradamante is impossibly cool: she rescues Ruggiero from a wizard and she wields a magical lance that unhorses anyone it touches. She’s Orlando’s cousin and one of Chalemagne’s paladins. Both characters are considered descendants of Astyanax, son of Hector. They eventually get married, after Bradamante convinces Charlemagne to hold a peculiar tournament: she would only marry whoever was able to resist against her in battle from dawn to dusk. Bradamante, ladies and gentlemen.
Ariosto’s Orlando is one of the longest poems in European literature: 38,736 lines. Ariosto had a pretty adventurous life himself, as he was a diplomat who was almost killed by order of the Pope during one of his missions. His ottava rima is considered one of the highest achievements of pre-Illuminist literature. In 2009, Alitalia named one of its planes after him (Airbus A320-216).

(This is completely off topic, forgive me, but during highschool I used to study with some friends, it was always the four of us, and we would start around 15:00 and finish around 21:00/22:00. I will never forget studying the Orlando Furioso, because it we’d been studying for maybe seven hours straight and my friend read something like: “At this point Orlando got so mad he kicked his donkey in the chest and sent it flying like a bird until it landed on top of a mountain and died”; and it sounded so incredibly hilarious to my exhausted mind I started laughing like an idiot, which made my friends start laughing like idiots, and we just couldn’t stop for maybe twenty freaking minutes and were actually aching and stuttering ‘HE KICKED THE DONKEY INTO A FUCKING MOUNTAIN’ like a bunch of weirdos and yeah. Good times.)

stelleappese:

italiansreclaimingitaly:

What a coincidence! Tumblr celebrates International Literacy Day and Google celebrates Ludovico Ariosto’s 540th birthday.

Ludovico Ariosto was born on this day in 1474 in Reggio Emilia and is one of the most important figures in Italian Literature. His most famous work is the epic poem “Orlando Furioso" (1516), a continuation of Matteo Maria Boiardo’s "Orlando Innamorato" (1495). Orlando is Charlemagne’s most famous paladin during the war against the Saracens and the poem describes his struggle among duty, chivalry and love for the pagan princess Angelica in a world where reality and fantasy merge. There are a wizard, a sea monster, a hippogriff and a trip to the moon. No kidding. 

Another couple of noteworthy characters are the female Christian warrior Bradamante and the Saracen Ruggiero, who are regarded as the ancestors of the noble Este family, patrons of Boiardo and Ariosto. Bradamante and Ruggiero fall in love, but she refuses to marry him unless he converts to Christianity. Bradamante is impossibly cool: she rescues Ruggiero from a wizard and she wields a magical lance that unhorses anyone it touches. She’s Orlando’s cousin and one of Chalemagne’s paladins. Both characters are considered descendants of Astyanax, son of Hector. They eventually get married, after Bradamante convinces Charlemagne to hold a peculiar tournament: she would only marry whoever was able to resist against her in battle from dawn to dusk. Bradamante, ladies and gentlemen.

Ariosto’s Orlando is one of the longest poems in European literature: 38,736 lines. Ariosto had a pretty adventurous life himself, as he was a diplomat who was almost killed by order of the Pope during one of his missions. His ottava rima is considered one of the highest achievements of pre-Illuminist literature. In 2009, Alitalia named one of its planes after him (Airbus A320-216).

(This is completely off topic, forgive me, but during highschool I used to study with some friends, it was always the four of us, and we would start around 15:00 and finish around 21:00/22:00. I will never forget studying the Orlando Furioso, because it we’d been studying for maybe seven hours straight and my friend read something like: “At this point Orlando got so mad he kicked his donkey in the chest and sent it flying like a bird until it landed on top of a mountain and died”; and it sounded so incredibly hilarious to my exhausted mind I started laughing like an idiot, which made my friends start laughing like idiots, and we just couldn’t stop for maybe twenty freaking minutes and were actually aching and stuttering ‘HE KICKED THE DONKEY INTO A FUCKING MOUNTAIN’ like a bunch of weirdos and yeah. Good times.)

Another book I haven’t read yet, but seems to be really useful for navigating certain concepts relating to gold in renaissance literature. You will have probably heard about Thomas More’s Utopia. In Utopia there are passages advocating the devaluation of gold as a means of transaction. Given that gold at the time was imported from Western Africa and the New World (America), these passages actually advocate the exploitation of the exporting parties on the grounds of physical wealth being morally inferior. More’s Utopia, just like Machiavelli’s The Prince are two of the most important works of the Renaissance for understanding the formation of colonialism and colonial violence. 

I haven’t read it yet- just perused it-, but it seems quite interesting. Also, sorry for the absence, I’ve been catching up with my reading and there are going to be a lot of interesting stuff in the future.

Something from Cyprus as I may divine:
It is a business of some heat: the galleys
Have sent a dozen sequent messengers
This very night at one another’s heels,
And many of the consuls, raised and met,
Are at the duke’s already: you have been
hotly call’d for;
When, being not at your lodging to be found,
The senate hath sent about three several guests
To search you out.

Cassio, Act I, Scene II, from William Shakespeare’s Othello

Once again in the background of action there is the struggle for the Mediterranean. Malta, Rhodes, Cyprus, all isles of the Mediterranean, as seen before in Christopher Marlowes’ The Jew of Malta happen to be the “prizes” in the colossal conflict between christian western Europe and the Ottoman Empire. However, who actually lives in these Mediterranean islands?

Rhodes and Cyprus who are mentioned in the play were- and are today- islands with primarily greek populations. Of course being quite big islands and in a strategic position for Mediterranean commerce they were also pretty diverse during the renaissance. Greek populations in these islands were under the Byzantine Empire from later antiquity up until 1204 when Constantinople- the capital of the Byzantine Empire- was sacked by the Venetian Crusaders. The sack of Constantinople provided the necessary finances and territories for the Venetians to establish themselves as the dominant seafaring power in the Mediterranean. This period in greek history is referred to as latinokratia (latinocracy), or frankokratia (francocracy). “Frankos/Frankoi”  is term for all western europeans. After a series of battles both at sea and mainland, greek territories and greek peoples passed from the control of western europe to the Ottoman Empire. 

  • First Senator. This cannot be,
    By no assay of reason: ‘tis a pageant.
    To keep us in false gaze. When we consider
    The importancy of Cyprus to the Turk,
    And let ourselves again but understand,
    That as it more concerns the Turk than Rhodes,
    So may he with more facile question bear it,
    For that it stands not in such warlike brace,
    But altogether lacks the abilities
    That Rhodes is dress’d in: if we make thought of this,
    We must not think the Turk is so unskilful
    To leave that latest which concerns him first,
    Neglecting an attempt of ease and gain,
    To wake and wage a danger profitless.

Othello ultimately is played out in front of this era of transition. And it could be said that the failed romance between Othello and Desdemona could allude to the perpetually incompatible temperaments of the Orient and the West. Othello and Desdemona after all destroy each other on this sort of “no man’s land” . Cyprus, despite its significance to the West, after all, is nothing but a “colony”. It is insignificant beyond its geographical importance. And so too Othello’s and Desdemona’s affair is beyond significance outside of what if offers to the West. So what do Othello and Desdemona offer to the West?

Iago’s evil (a preview of part 2)

Iago’s evil: The necessary evil

An overview of Iago’s “evil” in William Shakespeare’s Othello

On the previous part we presented misogyny as a factor for violence against women in Othello. Misogyny is extremely important because it is the instrument with which we achieve a tragic ending in this play. If men did not view women as inferior then there would be no tragic murder, there would be no tragic victims.

However, when do we really have a tragedy in our hands?

Is it in the number of the victims and their gruesome deaths? Is it in the relationship between the victim and the aggressor? Or is it in the chain of events that separates the cast into victims and aggressors? And if there is a distinct point in the dramatic time, where a character becomes an aggressor- because without aggressors there would be no victims- then when is that in Othello.

Talking about racism in Othello is impossible without talking extensively about the politics in the Mediterranean and the english endeavours into gaining a pathway towards the Indies. It’s no surprise that sexism and racism go hand in hand together, but what is it that causes those? Before we talk about racism we will talk about imperialism.

Iago’s racism towards Othello is extremely obvious. It is the racism that everyone can see. The white man who envies the black man so passionately that he personally wants to destroy him…However, for every visible racial transgression, there is a racial transgression that remains completely invisible to this day on stage.

What is the army of Venice doing in Cyprus? And why is an english playwright writing about Venice battling the Turks in Cyprus. And finally if Venice won and an english play celebrated its victory, did Cyprus win?